Source

bikepacking.com

Published

1 year ago

The Kora (film)

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“High in the Himalayan hinterlands of Sichuan province, three massive mountains soar above sprawling floodplains and bamboo forests below. For Tibetans, a successful pilgrimage around the base of these sacred giants—known as the “Yading Kora”–is believed to purify a lifetime of negative karma.” Inspired by this idea, Brice Minnigh, Joey Schusler, and Sam Seward set out by bike on a 10-day self-supported bikepacking journey to complete this kora.

Source

bikerumor.com

Published

1 year ago

#Vanlife: The Overland Access EDC might be the ultimate adventure camping trailer

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At this point, for us anyways, Vanlife is just a tongue in cheek hashtag. While it may best apply to the finer points of living out of a cargo van to chase your singletrack dreams, for those of us who already have a vehicle that’s not a van, it could just as easily apply to something like the Overland Access EDC trailer. You could even just call it camping, but your average camper won’t make it anywhere near where you can go with the EDC. And once you get there, it just might be the most well equipped trailer we’ve seen so far.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Photo Gallery: A Turbulent Journey of Self-Discovery at the Race to the Rock

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n September 1, I set out to ride my bicycle from the south of Tasmania to Uluru — a 3,500km, off-road, unsupported adventure, as part of Race to the Rock. Why? Well, I’m not totally sure. I guess it was to set a huge challenge for myself, face fears of isolation, and to try what seemed almost impossible.

Just getting to the start line was hard enough. Cockles Creek in Tasmania is home to Australia’s southernmost road. There’s not much there — the closest accommodation or basic service is 20 kilometres away. If you’ve forgotten something, there’s no popping down to the local Coles. Being unsupported, you’ve got to pack your bike and ready yourself to be self-sufficient for the whole journey. No support cars, no food drops, and in the spirit of the race, no external help from friends, families or followers of the race.

While the race officially started at 6.23am on September 1 2018, prep for the task was long and mind-boggling. It’s the first time I’ve done anything like this – I’m no bikepacker or hard-out adventurer. Most people who tackle these events are either very bearded or very experienced, or both, so who was I to do this? I was stupid enough to announce my intentions publicly, so that was it — I had seven months to work it out.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Road Worlds return to Australia: Wollongong to host 2022 championships

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The UCI Road World Championships will return to Australia in 2022 with Wollongong, New South Wales selected as the event’s host city.

The eight-day event comes 12 years after Australia’s only other Road World Championships, held in Geelong in 2010. It will be the first Road Worlds held in the Southern Hemisphere since then.

It’s likely to be several years before the road race course for Wollongong is announced, but there are suggestions it will start in Sydney before heading the roughly 80km south along the coast to Wollongong for laps of a local circuit. The hills west of Wollongong create the potential for a challenging course.

New South Wales’ Minister for Sport Stuart Eyres heralded the announcement as a great victory for Wollongong and the state of New South Wales.

Source

theguardian.com

Published

1 year ago

Fjords, ferries and forks: cycling the Haute Route Norway

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Garlanded with wispy clouds, jagged mountains rise sharply above glassy lakes, reflected to sky with such perfection you are almost dizzy with how upside down it all appears. Or is that a mirage – from exhaustion? From the moment 250 cyclists clattered nervously, like skinny, helmeted warriors on to a ferry at 6.45am to battle through the water in mist and rain for 45 minutes even before the start, it was clear this would be no ordinary event. Cycling in Norway is less travelling on land, more an undulating series of roads and bridges linking breathtaking fjords; a constant movement between mountain, sea and lake.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Photo Gallery: How I Accidentally Cycled Around the World

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“In January 2015 I left London on my bicycle to see how far east I could pedal … In December 2017 I arrived home having cycled around the world via 42 countries and 30,000 miles.” – Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett

The vast majority of people that ride around the planet do so after months if not years of planning and training. They’ve almost always had a lifelong fascination with cycling and the idea of circumnavigating the globe has been a long-time goal. Not Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett. Here’s how the half-Brit, half-Dane describes his ridiculous, 50,000km, nearly-three-year adventure.

Source

outsideonline.com

Published

1 year ago

The Best Backcountry Huts for Mountain Bikers

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Why hike when you can ride?

Backcountry huts used to be the exclusive domain of skiers and backpackers, but lately, cabins from Maine to Oregon are doing their best to cater to two wheels, with perks like tuning stations, flowing singletrack, and gear shuttles.

Source

bikepacking.com

Published

1 year ago

Bikerafting Scotland’s Great Wilderness

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We’d been out there paddling for hours. I was all too aware that my hands were covered in blisters, but denial seemed like the best way to keep on pushing forwards. As the wind suddenly picked up, it was clear that making any forward progress was going to be nearly impossible, as if the conditions weren’t challenging enough already. I accepted that getting blown backwards was the only likely outcome and turned to Cat to suggest that we pull in for a bit. She was nowhere to be seen. Scanning around the vast loch, the only thing that caught my eye was a harras of white horses near the shore.

 

The old adage says that “life begins outside your comfort zone,” and if that’s the case I’d certainly been doing some extreme living that weekend. Egged on by an equally enthusiastic mate, the idea to paddle the length of a six-mile loch with no escape routes on either side for our first packrafting trip might have been slightly ambitious, bordering on insane. But what do you really learn from something you can do comfortably? “In at the deep end” seems to have become my motto!