Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

219 Beats Per Minute: The Day My Heart Short-Circuited

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Want to see an ER nurse panic? Ride up to the hospital on your bike, looking pro in your team kit, and tell them you’re having “a problem” with your heart. In ten seconds I had three nurses swarming me, taking my vital signs. I kept urging them to get the EKG before the episode passed, because this wasn’t the first time.

They did, and finally, I had the data needed for a diagnosis: Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT).

Let’s rewind a bit.

Source

cog.konaworld.com

Published

1 year ago

Connor Fearon is the Australian National Enduro Champion

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Over the weekend, in Connor Fearon’s hometown of Adelaide, South Australia, he unleashed a can of ass whooping on a stacked Aussie field at the Gravity Enduro National Championships and pulled off total stage domination over the two days racing. His eight first places would give him and the Process 153 CR DL 29 he was riding the title by over a minute.

“For the second year running the Enduro National Champs were held in my hometown of Adelaide, SA at the Fox Creek trail network. The race was a two-day event with eight stages split over the two days. I chose to race my 29er as a lot of the stages are fast rolling and it feels a bit easier to keep the momentum going with the big wheels. I know Fox Creek like the back of my hand so it definitely was an advantage I had over all the competition from out of state. Although there were some new sections built for the weekend which were really technical and challenging. I had eight perfect stages with no crashes or mechanicals and the Process ended up being the bike to beat! I had a clean sweep and ended up with the title once the weekend was done.” – Connor Fearon

Source

marathonmtb.com

Published

1 year ago

Always finish the stage race – Cape to Cape lessons

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If I’m honest, when I woke up this morning I really didn’t feel like racing the 4th and final stage of the 2018 Cape to Cape. This sounds a bit rubbish but there are a few excuses (I can’t call them reasons). It was raining again, I was tired, the ride to the start (this is a race training camp after all) was over 20km, and did I mentioned it would be wet. I don’t particularly like riding my mountain bike in the wet. It sounds soft, but I’ve done it plenty of times over the past 15+ years of mountain bike racing. I’ve done my time. I know I don’t particularly like it, so given the option of riding in the wet, or not, I’d opt to not ride.

But this isn’t just choosing about getting on the bike or not, it is finishing a stage race. It is very easy to justify not starting a stage, or a race at the time when you’re not feeling it. But you cannot change that decision later on. Remorse can be strong, and if you truly are too tired or unwell then you can always stop. But I’ve learnt the best thing to do is to just finish it.

Source

pinkbike.com

Published

1 year ago

Opinion: Why Have Bike Makers Ignored this Grassroots Fix?

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Why does it take so long for corporate bike brands to address popular grassroots trends? Wide bars, short stems, dropper posts, one-by drivetrains, chain guides, 29ers, wide rims, tubeless systems… the list of user-generated improvements that were widely adopted years before mainstream bike and component makers committed to production goes on… Rather than answer that question, I’ll give you another yet-to-be-addressed grassroots example that has been ‘trending’ for over a decade.

How many riders wrap their bikes to protect their frame finishes from gouging and scratches? Yeah, a lot, and the practice isn’t limited to fastidious dentists who can’t live with the sight of a scratched up Hightower perched on the back of their recently detailed BMW X6 M.

I took a straw poll while I was skulking around the Whistler bike park that suggested that as many as one in four riders had wrapped their frames. A little more poking around revealed that a large number of bike brands and shops religiously wrap their demo and rental fleets as well.

You don’t have to search far for a compelling reason to protect a frame. Pinkbike’s Buy/Sell pages are filled with close-up images of minor frame blemishes, posted by sellers to assure potential buyers that their bikes look close to new.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Photo Gallery: A Turbulent Journey of Self-Discovery at the Race to the Rock

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n September 1, I set out to ride my bicycle from the south of Tasmania to Uluru — a 3,500km, off-road, unsupported adventure, as part of Race to the Rock. Why? Well, I’m not totally sure. I guess it was to set a huge challenge for myself, face fears of isolation, and to try what seemed almost impossible.

Just getting to the start line was hard enough. Cockles Creek in Tasmania is home to Australia’s southernmost road. There’s not much there — the closest accommodation or basic service is 20 kilometres away. If you’ve forgotten something, there’s no popping down to the local Coles. Being unsupported, you’ve got to pack your bike and ready yourself to be self-sufficient for the whole journey. No support cars, no food drops, and in the spirit of the race, no external help from friends, families or followers of the race.

While the race officially started at 6.23am on September 1 2018, prep for the task was long and mind-boggling. It’s the first time I’ve done anything like this – I’m no bikepacker or hard-out adventurer. Most people who tackle these events are either very bearded or very experienced, or both, so who was I to do this? I was stupid enough to announce my intentions publicly, so that was it — I had seven months to work it out.

Source

singletracks.com

Published

1 year ago

Why Europe Warmly Embraces the Electric Bike, While the USA Remains Chilly

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While the debate broils hot in the US over e-bike access to trails and to the overall cycling market, sales and representation in the EU continue to grow rapidly. Brands like Fox are seeing 35% of their OEM (direct to producer) sales across Europe go to e-bike models, and those numbers are growing steadily every quarter. In France, e-bike sales increased by 50% in 2017, while Italy saw a 25% increase of electric-assisted sales throughout the peninsula.

The 2018 Eurobike floors were carpeted with e-bikes from wall to wall. Brands fought hard to get their latest electric offerings ready for the show, occasionally at the expense of analog bike models. This year’s Eurobike theme was aimed at enhanced mobility and transportation alternatives, and batteries were decidedly a means toward those ends.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

The SHEcret Pro: On Worlds, minimum wages, and Grand Tours for women

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The SHEcret Pro is back and she’s got a lot on her mind! In this post our anonymous insider gives us the goss from the Road World Championships, offers her thoughts on the newly announced minimum wage for top women’s teams, and explains her frustrations with calls for three-week women’s races.


Well, here I am, almost at the end of yet another professional season. I’m on a bit of a high after the World Championships in Innsbruck, Austria, a race that had more climbing than any other recent edition of Worlds. It must be said that while the course was tough, it wasn’t necessarily the unequivocally rider-against-gravity race that some were expecting.

Granted, the 14%, 5km Gnadenwald climb ignited some pain, and shed a few riders who were never going to make it anyway, but it was too early in the race for the real contenders to risk pulling off any big attacks there. The Olympic Circuit climbs were hard too, but there were notably some ‘non-climbers’ up there, making the race hard and mixing things up.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Ride on: The art of staying motivated on the bike

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You wake during the night and hear the rain pouring down outside. At that point you begin negotiating with yourself: will you get up for the planned ride in the morning? Or will you stay in bed, warm and dry? You defer the decision until morning, but hesitation has crept in.

The alarm screams, and you check your phone to see a) if there is rain falling, and b) whether the group has cancelled the ride so you are less responsible for the decision.

We’ve all been there. Some days we might decide to skip the ride. Others, we get up and ride in terrible conditions. So, what is it that drives us to get out there when the weather is not kind for our outdoor sport?

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Photo Gallery: How I Accidentally Cycled Around the World

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“In January 2015 I left London on my bicycle to see how far east I could pedal … In December 2017 I arrived home having cycled around the world via 42 countries and 30,000 miles.” – Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett

The vast majority of people that ride around the planet do so after months if not years of planning and training. They’ve almost always had a lifelong fascination with cycling and the idea of circumnavigating the globe has been a long-time goal. Not Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett. Here’s how the half-Brit, half-Dane describes his ridiculous, 50,000km, nearly-three-year adventure.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

The length of suffering: A gravel rider’s unlikely pursuit record

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Two years ago, Ashton Lambie was a shop mechanic in Lawrence, Kansas, a gravel fiend, the fastest man to ride the 430-mile length of his home state, and a top finisher at Dirty Kanza. On Friday, he became the fastest man in history to ride 4,000 meters around a velodrome.

 

In the semi-final of the Pan American Championships, Lambie took more than three seconds off a world record set in 2011 by Jack Bobridge, and previously by the inimitable Chris Boardman, two men of impeccable track and time trial pedigree. In the final, Lambie again beat Bobridge’s old record, with a 4’09”. Three seconds taken by a gravel grinder.