Source

pinkbike.com

Published

8 months ago

Getting to Know: Enduro World Series Champion Elliott Heap

Tags

Even at just 20 years old, Elliott has certainly made an impression on the sport since transitioning from motocross in 2013. In his first elite year racing DH World Cups, Elliott was a regular top-30 rider and has continued to show his intentions. After the CRC/Mavic team announced they’d be focusing their efforts solely on enduro at the end of 2017, Elliott had already built up a strong understanding of how to be competitively successful. Luckily for Elliott, enduro wasn’t a new discipline and as we can see from his form in 2018, he’s exceptionally talented. We caught up with Elliott to find out how his racing is going, what it’s like being on a team with such legendary and seasoned veterans and how he feels about winning his first EWS title.

Source

cog.konaworld.com

Published

9 months ago

Connor Fearon is the Australian National Enduro Champion

Tags , ,

Over the weekend, in Connor Fearon’s hometown of Adelaide, South Australia, he unleashed a can of ass whooping on a stacked Aussie field at the Gravity Enduro National Championships and pulled off total stage domination over the two days racing. His eight first places would give him and the Process 153 CR DL 29 he was riding the title by over a minute.

“For the second year running the Enduro National Champs were held in my hometown of Adelaide, SA at the Fox Creek trail network. The race was a two-day event with eight stages split over the two days. I chose to race my 29er as a lot of the stages are fast rolling and it feels a bit easier to keep the momentum going with the big wheels. I know Fox Creek like the back of my hand so it definitely was an advantage I had over all the competition from out of state. Although there were some new sections built for the weekend which were really technical and challenging. I had eight perfect stages with no crashes or mechanicals and the Process ended up being the bike to beat! I had a clean sweep and ended up with the title once the weekend was done.” – Connor Fearon

Source

pinkbike.com

Published

9 months ago

Jolanda Neff Joins Trek Factory Racing

Tags

Swiss cross-country mountain bike champion Jolanda Neff will join the ranks of Trek Factory Racing XC. The three-time World Cup overall winner will continue to focus on the World Cup cross-country circuit, but will also race select events with the new Trek Factory Racing Cyclocross and Trek-Segafredo teams.

At just 25 years old, Neff has already made an indelible mark on cycling. She is an elite World Champion, three-time World Cup Champion, three-time European Champion, four-time Swiss Champion, and the winner of 12 World Cups.

“I’m extremely excited to join the Trek family,” said Neff. “I love Trek as a brand and am passionate about their philosophy of developing strong women’s programs alongside their men’s teams. It’s also a great pleasure that I will be able to race in MTB, CX, and road, all under the same family of teams. It has been my lifelong dream to race at the highest level on the fastest bikes across different disciplines, and I have found the perfect partner.”

Source

bikepacking.com

Published

9 months ago

Jenny Graham Sets Women’s Around-the-World Cycling Record

Tags ,

Jenny Graham is a 38-year-old endurance cyclist from the Scottish Highlands. On the 16th of June, Jenny left from Berlin, Germany, riding east. Last Thursday, she pedaled back into Berlin from the west. Within the 125 days this mission took to complete, Jenny rode some 29,657 kilometers across four continents to become the fastest woman to ride around the world unsupported. The old record of 144 days was nearly three weeks longer, set by Paola Gianotti in 2014.

Source

marathonmtb.com

Published

9 months ago

Always finish the stage race – Cape to Cape lessons

Tags ,

If I’m honest, when I woke up this morning I really didn’t feel like racing the 4th and final stage of the 2018 Cape to Cape. This sounds a bit rubbish but there are a few excuses (I can’t call them reasons). It was raining again, I was tired, the ride to the start (this is a race training camp after all) was over 20km, and did I mentioned it would be wet. I don’t particularly like riding my mountain bike in the wet. It sounds soft, but I’ve done it plenty of times over the past 15+ years of mountain bike racing. I’ve done my time. I know I don’t particularly like it, so given the option of riding in the wet, or not, I’d opt to not ride.

But this isn’t just choosing about getting on the bike or not, it is finishing a stage race. It is very easy to justify not starting a stage, or a race at the time when you’re not feeling it. But you cannot change that decision later on. Remorse can be strong, and if you truly are too tired or unwell then you can always stop. But I’ve learnt the best thing to do is to just finish it.

Source

road.cc

Published

9 months ago

Simon Yates is first British winner of UCI WorldTour Classification

Tags ,

Simon Yates has been confirmed as the top rider in the UCI WorldTour Classification for 2018, a year in which he led the Giro d’Italia for a fortnight before going on to take his first Grand Tour overall win at the Vuelta.

Meanwhile, the UCI Women’s WorldTour Classification has been won by another Mitchelton-Scott rider, Annemiek van Vleuten.

The pair were recognised at the UCI Gala Awards in China today, held after the conclusion of the final races on the men’s and women’s calendars, the Tour of Guangxi.

Yates is one of two British cyclists in the top five of the men’s ranking, the other being Team Sky’s Geraint Thomas, who was in fourth place.

Source

velonews.com

Published

9 months ago

Sagan: No Interest in Chasing Tour de France GC

Tags ,

FLORENCE, Italy (VN) — Peter Sagan (Bora-Hansgrohe) is not aiming to shed weight and win the Tour de France in the coming years.

Sagan, who just relinquished his rainbow jersey after a three-year run as world champion, plans to keep following the path that has led to success so far.

“Who knows what’s going to happen with me,” he told The Telegraphwhen asked if he would lose weight to challenge the top riders like Sky’s Chris Froome and Geraint Thomas in the Tour de France.

“If I lose the weight, am I still going to be strong? I might not be the man I am. Maybe I will lose what nature made me.

“My feeling is: why change something that is working?”

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

10 months ago

Road Worlds return to Australia: Wollongong to host 2022 championships

Tags , ,

The UCI Road World Championships will return to Australia in 2022 with Wollongong, New South Wales selected as the event’s host city.

The eight-day event comes 12 years after Australia’s only other Road World Championships, held in Geelong in 2010. It will be the first Road Worlds held in the Southern Hemisphere since then.

It’s likely to be several years before the road race course for Wollongong is announced, but there are suggestions it will start in Sydney before heading the roughly 80km south along the coast to Wollongong for laps of a local circuit. The hills west of Wollongong create the potential for a challenging course.

New South Wales’ Minister for Sport Stuart Eyres heralded the announcement as a great victory for Wollongong and the state of New South Wales.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

10 months ago

The SHEcret Pro: On Worlds, minimum wages, and Grand Tours for women

Tags , ,

The SHEcret Pro is back and she’s got a lot on her mind! In this post our anonymous insider gives us the goss from the Road World Championships, offers her thoughts on the newly announced minimum wage for top women’s teams, and explains her frustrations with calls for three-week women’s races.


Well, here I am, almost at the end of yet another professional season. I’m on a bit of a high after the World Championships in Innsbruck, Austria, a race that had more climbing than any other recent edition of Worlds. It must be said that while the course was tough, it wasn’t necessarily the unequivocally rider-against-gravity race that some were expecting.

Granted, the 14%, 5km Gnadenwald climb ignited some pain, and shed a few riders who were never going to make it anyway, but it was too early in the race for the real contenders to risk pulling off any big attacks there. The Olympic Circuit climbs were hard too, but there were notably some ‘non-climbers’ up there, making the race hard and mixing things up.