Source

bikeradar.com

Published

10 months ago

Review: Wilier Triestina Cento10 Air disc Di2

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The days of compromised aero road bikes are gone. From aerodynamic, efficient and comfortable, you’d be lucky to get two, but thanks to improved carbon layups and informed design, Wilier’s Cento10 Air Disc proves three into one does go.

Its profile is the result of hard won physics and aerodynamic work. Every tube that needs to slice through the air has a truncated aerofoil profile, plus the bar and stem are integrated carbon fibre and aerodynamic.
The Shimano brake hoses and Di2 gear wires are integrated, and the thru-axle ends are flush with the frame and fork. The fork is broad shouldered, and the seatstays are a generous width, reducing turbulence from the wheel, but the asymmetric chainstays are deep and burly, directing energy from the cranks and wide bottom bracket shell rearwards.

Source

pinkbike.com

Published

10 months ago

Review: Specialized Stumpjumper EVO 29

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The new Stumpjumper was released earlier this year, ushering in the next era of a model that’s been in Specialized’s lineup since the very beginning. There are three different versions: the Stumpjumper, the Stumpjumper ST, and the Stumpjumper EVO. The standard and the ST versions aren’t really drastic departures from the previous models; yes, they have a new one-sided frame, and they’re a little longer and a little slacker than before, but the geometry is still on the conservative side of things. But then there’s the aluminum EVO model…

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

11 months ago

Continental goes tubeless with new Grand Prix 5000 road tire

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The original Grand Prix first hit the market 14 years ago, and Continental has obviously learned a few things in that time. Not surprisingly, then, the company claims the new Grand Prix 5000 is better than the latest Grand Prix 4000 S II in every key performance metric. It’s supposedly faster with 12% less rolling resistance; more durable with a 20% boost in puncture protection; 10g lighter (for the 700x25c tube-type size); and even offers a smoother and more comfortable ride.

Continental builds the Grand Prix 5000 with a three-ply, 330tpi (total) nylon casing, augmented with a more finely woven Vectran breaker belt and a new elastomeric casing element (dubbed Active Comfort Technology) that somehow damps road vibration without introducing any speed-robbing hysteresis effects.

Continental’s trademark Black Chili compound hasn’t been left alone, either. In addition to using the latest formulation, the Grand Prix 5000’s shoulder tread now gets a subtle laser-etched texture that the company says provides superb cornering grip straight out of the box — basically the equivalent of pre-scuffing a new tire. And as a bonus, that texturing supposedly also helps oncoming air flow more smoothly around the tire casing for reduced aerodynamic drag.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

11 months ago

2019 SRAM Red eTap goes 12-speed

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The 2018 road racing season may be all but over, but things are heating up on the tech front. Over the last few months, there has been plenty of speculation that SRAM was headed towards a 12-speed transmission for the road, and while the company has yet to officially comment on its plans for 2019, some early samples were spotted at the Saitama Criterium in Japan over the weekend. From what we’ve seen, SRAM’s revamped 2019 Red eTap wireless road groupset will feature a new 12-speed cassette, a one-piece machined aluminum double chainring, updated lever ergonomics, a clutched rear derailleur, and even a new Quarq power meter.

Source

ridinggravel.com

Published

11 months ago

Review: Michelin Power Gravel 35mm and 40mm Tires — At The Finish

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Michelin Power Gravel 35mm and 40mm Tires: At The Finish- by Guitar Ted with N.Y. Roll

The Michelin line of gravel tires is fairly new and we were curious as to what this well known brand had cooked up for riders of off-pavement roads and trails. The tires have been used and tested thoroughly, so we have a final word on these treads now. The older posts are linked here for your convenience. Please check those out for technical specs and more on initial set up and use. One more thing- the Power Gravel tires do come in a cyclo cross friendly size which we think would make a great “grass course” tire, in case you were wondering about that. Now on to our final review of the other two Power Gravel tire sizes.

Source

bikehugger.com

Published

11 months ago

Sony Cyber-shot HX99, Perfect for Travel

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Sony announced the Cyber-shot® HX99 (model DSC-HX99) camera, an exciting new travel zoom that packs an extreme zoom range of 24-720mm into the world’s smallest camera body of its kind.

 

Well-timed for my trip to Paris and travel photography because the new HX99 has features like the pro Alpha series at a much lower cost. This is the camera and any of the super compact Cyber-shots I recommend for your jersey pocket.

Source

bikerumor.com

Published

11 months ago

#Vanlife: The Overland Access EDC might be the ultimate adventure camping trailer

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At this point, for us anyways, Vanlife is just a tongue in cheek hashtag. While it may best apply to the finer points of living out of a cargo van to chase your singletrack dreams, for those of us who already have a vehicle that’s not a van, it could just as easily apply to something like the Overland Access EDC trailer. You could even just call it camping, but your average camper won’t make it anywhere near where you can go with the EDC. And once you get there, it just might be the most well equipped trailer we’ve seen so far.

Source

cyclingweekly.com

Published

11 months ago

Tech of the week: new bikes from Trek, Spesh and Look and options for winter

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October’s Tech of the Month video looks as Giro’s new top of the range Aether MIPS helmet, a rain jacket from Castelli and Specialized’s tubeless tyres, as well as the new Trek Madone Disc.

Another flashy new aero bike is the Look 795 Blade RS. We’ve gone over the bike’s tech and its aero credentials.

Canyon has a new rainbow striped Ultimate bike for Alejandro Valverde this week. We’ve also had a look at the Giant and Liv bikes to be ridden next year by the CCC Team, the replacement for BMC Racing. And we’ve covered Rapha’s return to WorldTour sponsorship with its announcement that it will be clothing EF Education First-Drapac next year.

With Kona just around the corner, last week bike brands were unveiling their slipperiest triathlon bikes. And they don’t come much more radical than the new Specialized Shiv, which it reckons is 60 seconds faster than the outgoing model over the Kona course.

Source

pinkbike.com

Published

11 months ago

Opinion: Why Have Bike Makers Ignored this Grassroots Fix?

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Why does it take so long for corporate bike brands to address popular grassroots trends? Wide bars, short stems, dropper posts, one-by drivetrains, chain guides, 29ers, wide rims, tubeless systems… the list of user-generated improvements that were widely adopted years before mainstream bike and component makers committed to production goes on… Rather than answer that question, I’ll give you another yet-to-be-addressed grassroots example that has been ‘trending’ for over a decade.

How many riders wrap their bikes to protect their frame finishes from gouging and scratches? Yeah, a lot, and the practice isn’t limited to fastidious dentists who can’t live with the sight of a scratched up Hightower perched on the back of their recently detailed BMW X6 M.

I took a straw poll while I was skulking around the Whistler bike park that suggested that as many as one in four riders had wrapped their frames. A little more poking around revealed that a large number of bike brands and shops religiously wrap their demo and rental fleets as well.

You don’t have to search far for a compelling reason to protect a frame. Pinkbike’s Buy/Sell pages are filled with close-up images of minor frame blemishes, posted by sellers to assure potential buyers that their bikes look close to new.

Source

singletracks.com

Published

11 months ago

Updated Shimano ME7 Trail/Enduro Mountain Bike Shoe Review

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Quality cycling shoes and pedals are synonymous with the Shimano brand, and their current crop of footwear is as good as it’s ever been. The new ME7 shoe is their top end trail/enduro shoe, and has seen a few changes for this year.

The ME7 definitely has some cross-over with the AM9, and the Shimano nomenclature isn’t exactly clear. The AM9 is definitely aimed more at downhill with more padding, whereas the ME7 is more about performance and efficiency.

Changes for this year include a different upper made from a perforated synthetic leather, rather than mesh. This supposedly improves the durability of the shoe while also enhancing breathability.

Shimano also introduced a new fit for 2019 called “Volume+”, which essentially means a larger toe box across the range. This allows a wider range of foot shapes to fit. Also of note is the buckle, which has been slightly slimmed down, to keep it tucked out of harm’s way, plus revised armor for better protection.