Source

bikepacking.com

Published

10 months ago

The Kora (film)

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“High in the Himalayan hinterlands of Sichuan province, three massive mountains soar above sprawling floodplains and bamboo forests below. For Tibetans, a successful pilgrimage around the base of these sacred giants—known as the “Yading Kora”–is believed to purify a lifetime of negative karma.” Inspired by this idea, Brice Minnigh, Joey Schusler, and Sam Seward set out by bike on a 10-day self-supported bikepacking journey to complete this kora.

Source

bikepacking.com

Published

11 months ago

Jenny Graham Sets Women’s Around-the-World Cycling Record

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Jenny Graham is a 38-year-old endurance cyclist from the Scottish Highlands. On the 16th of June, Jenny left from Berlin, Germany, riding east. Last Thursday, she pedaled back into Berlin from the west. Within the 125 days this mission took to complete, Jenny rode some 29,657 kilometers across four continents to become the fastest woman to ride around the world unsupported. The old record of 144 days was nearly three weeks longer, set by Paola Gianotti in 2014.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

12 months ago

Photo Gallery: A Turbulent Journey of Self-Discovery at the Race to the Rock

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n September 1, I set out to ride my bicycle from the south of Tasmania to Uluru — a 3,500km, off-road, unsupported adventure, as part of Race to the Rock. Why? Well, I’m not totally sure. I guess it was to set a huge challenge for myself, face fears of isolation, and to try what seemed almost impossible.

Just getting to the start line was hard enough. Cockles Creek in Tasmania is home to Australia’s southernmost road. There’s not much there — the closest accommodation or basic service is 20 kilometres away. If you’ve forgotten something, there’s no popping down to the local Coles. Being unsupported, you’ve got to pack your bike and ready yourself to be self-sufficient for the whole journey. No support cars, no food drops, and in the spirit of the race, no external help from friends, families or followers of the race.

While the race officially started at 6.23am on September 1 2018, prep for the task was long and mind-boggling. It’s the first time I’ve done anything like this – I’m no bikepacker or hard-out adventurer. Most people who tackle these events are either very bearded or very experienced, or both, so who was I to do this? I was stupid enough to announce my intentions publicly, so that was it — I had seven months to work it out.

Source

theguardian.com

Published

1 year ago

Fjords, ferries and forks: cycling the Haute Route Norway

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Garlanded with wispy clouds, jagged mountains rise sharply above glassy lakes, reflected to sky with such perfection you are almost dizzy with how upside down it all appears. Or is that a mirage – from exhaustion? From the moment 250 cyclists clattered nervously, like skinny, helmeted warriors on to a ferry at 6.45am to battle through the water in mist and rain for 45 minutes even before the start, it was clear this would be no ordinary event. Cycling in Norway is less travelling on land, more an undulating series of roads and bridges linking breathtaking fjords; a constant movement between mountain, sea and lake.

Source

cyclingtips.com

Published

1 year ago

Photo Gallery: How I Accidentally Cycled Around the World

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“In January 2015 I left London on my bicycle to see how far east I could pedal … In December 2017 I arrived home having cycled around the world via 42 countries and 30,000 miles.” – Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett

The vast majority of people that ride around the planet do so after months if not years of planning and training. They’ve almost always had a lifelong fascination with cycling and the idea of circumnavigating the globe has been a long-time goal. Not Jonathan Kambskard-Bennett. Here’s how the half-Brit, half-Dane describes his ridiculous, 50,000km, nearly-three-year adventure.

Source

bikepacking.com

Published

1 year ago

Jay Petervary on the Silk Road Mountain Race

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At 5:15 pm local time on August 26th, 2018, the inaugural PEdALED Silk Road Mountain Race had a winner. After 1,721 kilometers in 8 days, 8 hours, and 15 minutes, Jay Petervary was the first to arrive at the finish line in Chong Kemin. “This was the hardest race I have done. But that is not why I took part. It’s about pioneering and racing bikes where no one did before. That is the real beauty of this race for me,” stated Jay on the SRMR blog. Jay led the race from the start, but it was never a sure thing. Several other riders, including second place finisher Levente Bagoly, were always pushing on close behind him.

The Silk Road Mountain Race was the first of its kind and followed a route through Kyrgyzstan based closely on our Tian Shan Traverse. Only about a third of the nearly 100 starters made it to the finish, owing to extreme weather, illness, and the sheer difficulty of the terrain. We caught up with Jay to ask him a few questions about his time pedaling across Kyrgyzstan.

Source

bikepacking.com

Published

1 year ago

A Journey Beyond II: Bikepacking The Pamir Highway

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The first Journey Beyond film followed German cyclist Marc Maurer from Istanbul, Turkey, to Tehran, Iran. Marc’s original plan was to begin each trip where the last left off, eventually crossing the entire globe. However, in A Journey Beyond II, instead of picking up up in Tehran, we find Marc in a more dramatic locale, traveling through the high Tian Shan Mountains in Kyrgyzstan before joining the Pamir Highway in Osh and continuing on to Dushanbe, Tajikistan. Watch the film below, find a collection of photos from the trip, and read on to see a map of the Pamir Highway with a little bit of background on the route…